Bambusa vulgaris 'Vittata'

Bambusa vulgaris 'Vittata'

Bambusa vulgaris 'Vittata' or Painted Bamboo, (previously known as Bambusa vulgaris 'Striata') is a giant tropical and subtropical clumping bamboo native to China and Japan. It is one of the most cultivated ornamental bamboos in the tropical world.

Bambusa vulgaris 'Vittata'

Bambusa vulgaris 'Vittata'

Height 10 - 15 m
Diameter 5 - 8 cm
Growth Habit Clumping
Climate Tropical - Subtropical
Hardiness -3 °C
Origin China - Japan

Culms: The glossy culms of Bambusa vulgaris 'Vittata' are bright yellow randomly marked with narrow and broad green stripes (or rarely light green with yellow stripes), and have an average height between 10-15 m. Internodes are 10-15 cm long, thick-walled, and have an average diameter of 5-8 cm. The type of striping on the culms is known to vary in different plants, or even within an individual plant. For example, there exist plants of yellow internodes with a few narrow green stripes, or without any green stripes, as well as plants of green internodes with a few yellow stripes.

Branches: Several to many clustered branches with 1 larger dominant branch. Branches are often striped as well.

Leaves: Narrow lance-shaped leaves which are on average 15-20 cm long and 2-2.5 cm wide.

Seeds: Last reported flowering and seed-setting was in 1873.

Habitat: This bamboo species grows up to an altitude of 1,000 m and can survive low temperatures up to -3°C.

Uses: Commonly and widely planted as an ornamental bamboo, as hedges to border land or as erosion control on slopes or riverbeds. Water from boiled shoots is also used as a medicine. Culms are used as poles in light construction or furniture. In Central America often used to make baskets or as tv-antenna posts.

Origin: Bambusa vulgaris 'Vittata' is native to China and Japan and commonly cultivated all over India for ornamental purposes.