Bamboo Beehives

Bamboo Beehives

In Latin America, farmers often use bamboo as beehives. Bamboo internodes (the part between 2 nodes) of larger diameter bamboo species such as Guadua angustifolia or Dendrocalamus asper are very well suited to make a bamboo beehive. A closed piece of bamboo is suspended horizontally under the roof of a house or shed, and a small hole made in one node at one end enables the bees to enter.

After a few days, the enclosed bamboo beehive will attract bees to live and raise their young. The presence of the bees can be seen when there is a waxy entranceway protruding from the hole that we made earlier (see pictures below).

The bees will create a densely packed matrix of hexagonal cells made of beeswax (honeycomb) inside the bamboo. They use the cells to store their honey, and to house eggs, larvae, and pupae. After about 4-6 weeks their honey can be harvested from the bamboo internode by splitting it length-wise with a machete.

Honey doesn't only taste great, it is also a natural energy booster and has a lot of health benefits because of its antibacterial properties. In Central America, farmers also use this "bamboo honey" to treat eye infections.