Gigantochloa apus

Gigantochloa apus

Gigantochloa apus, also known as String Bamboo or Pring Tali, is a dense tropical clumping bamboo native to Southeast Asia. It is the most economically important bamboo in Java, especially in the handicraft and furniture industry.

Gigantochloa apus

Height 8 - 22 m
Diameter 4 - 13 cm
Growth Habit Dense Clumper
Climate Tropical - Subtropical
Hardiness -2°C
Origin Southeast Asia

Culms: Strongly tufted woody bamboo with erect drooping culms that can reach between 8-22 m in height. The culms are bright green or yellowish-green when young, with an average diameter between 4-13 cm and a wall thickness between 6-13 mm.

Branches: Many clustered branches at the nodes with 1 larger dominant branch.

Leaves: Leaves are lance-shaped and on average 10-15 cm long and between 1.5-2 cm broad.

Habitat: This bamboo species grows well either on sandy soil or clay soil. It grows on lowlands along river banks or on hill slopes in moist evergreen forests up to 1500 m above sea level.

Uses: Gigantochloa apus is the most economically important bamboo in Java, especially in the handicraft and furniture industry. The poles are used extensively as building materials to construct roofing, scaffolding, bridges, walls, fences, etc. In Indonesia this bamboo is called Bambu Tali ('Tali' means String) because it is an excellent resource to make strong strips with the suppleness of leather.

Origin: Gigantochloa apus is native to Tenasserim, Myanmar, the north-eastern part of India, and the southern part of Thailand. This bamboo species is widely cultivated in Indonesia where it was probably introduced from Myanmar a long time ago.

Gigantochloa apus Distribution Map